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Episode #598 – Dinah Washington, Pt. 5 – 1954-59

Air Week: October 18-24, 2021

Dinah Washington, Pt. 5 – 1954-59

Dinah Washington was more than just the “Queen of The Jukeboxes,” “Queen Of The Blues” and any other prestigious but vacant title you could pin on her. Dinah was the real deal. As one of the best selling artists of the 20th Century, Dinah was no pop sensation or flash in the pan. She was a consummate artist, who developed a playful, yet serious style of phrasing all her own. This week, Matt The Cat continues to honor the great Dinah Washington with the final installment of our 5 part series. Part 5 picks up in early 1954 and follows Dinah’s great slew of hits through the beginning of 1959 and her best remembered tune, “What A Difference A Day Makes.” During this period, most of Dinah’s hits learn towards the pop side of things, although she won’t crossover and have a pop hit until “What A Difference A Day Makes” in ’59. She scores with her own rendition of established hits with “Dream,” “Teach Me Tonight” and “I Concentrate On You” and delivers a strong blues showing with “My Man’s An Undertaker” and “Big Long Slidin’ Thing.”. Biographer Nadine Cahodas returns to help us wrap up the series on Dinah by shedding some light on a few major songs as well as her untimely death. Matt The Cat is proud of have dedicated 5 programs to the still reigning “Queen,” Dinah Washington. 

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Episode #597 – Dinah Washington, Pt. 4 – 1951-53

Air Week: October 11-17, 2021

Dinah Washington, Pt. 4 – 1951-53

Dinah Washington was more than just the “Queen of The Jukeboxes,” “Queen Of The Blues” and any other prestigious but vacant title you could pin on her. Dinah was the real deal. As one of the best selling artists of the 20th Century, Dinah was no pop sensation or flash in the pan. She was a consummate artist, who developed a playful, yet serious style of phrasing all her own. This week, Matt The Cat continues to honor the great Dinah Washington with part 4 of our 5 part series. Part 4 picks up in the middle of 1951 and follows her Mercury Records releases through the end of 1953. During this time, Dinah scored 3 double-sided singles, beginning with her version of the tremendous hit “Wheel Of Fortune,” b/w “Tell Me Why” in ’52. Then she hit with the Blues standard “Trouble In Mind” b/w a new rendition of her own song, this time called “New Blowtop Blues.” Finally, after a year-long dry spell from the charts, she returns with “TV Is The Thing (This Year)” b/w “Fat Daddy.” Matt The Cat takes you through this often ignored, but no less riveting part of Dinah’s career on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

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Episode #596 – Dinah Washington, Pt. 3 – 1950-51

Air Week: October 4-10, 2021

Dinah Washington, Pt. 3 – 1950-51

Dinah Washington was more than just the “Queen of The Jukeboxes,” “Queen Of The Blues” and any other prestigious but vacant title you could pin on her. Dinah was the real deal. As one of the best selling artists of the 20th Century, Dinah was no pop sensation or flash in the pan. She was a consummate artist, who developed a playful, yet serious style of phrasing all her own. This week, Matt The Cat continues to honor the great Dinah Washington with part 3 of our multi-part series. Part 3 picks up at the very end of 1949 and follows her Mercury Records releases through 1951. The ol’ Rockola Juke In The Back is stocked with top 10 R&B hits “Good Daddy Blues,” “I Only Know,” “It Isn’t Fair,” “I’ll Never Be Free” and many more. We’ll dig on Dinah’s interpretation of the classic “Harbor Lights,” as well as Percy Mayfield’s “Please Send Me Someone To Love” and the Blues standard, “Ain’t Nobody’s Business.” She even scores a giant hit with her rendition of Hank Williams’ “Cold, Cold Heart.” Dinah Washington’s in top form on part 3, this week on the “Juke In The Back.”

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Episode #595 – Dinah Washington, Pt. 2 – 1947-49

Air Week: September 27-October 3, 2021

Dinah Washington, Pt. 2 – 1947-49

Dinah Washington was more than just the “Queen of The Jukeboxes,” “Queen Of The Blues” and any other prestigious but vacant title you could pin on her. Dinah was the real deal. As one of the best selling artists of the 20th Century, Dinah was no pop sensation or flash in the pan. She was a consummate artist, who developed a playful, yet serious style of phrasing all her own. This week, Matt The Cat continues to honor the great Dinah Washington with part 2 of our multi-part series on “The Queen.” Part 2 picks up in 1947 and begins with Dinah’s first charting hit for Mercury Records, the Fats Waller tune, “Ain’t Misbehavin’.” From there, she had a string of hits that peaks in 1948 with “Am I Asking Too Much,” her first #1 record. Her second #1 comes in 1949 with the jumpin’ “Baby Get Lost.” We’ll also hear Dinah’s interpretation of other classics, “I Sold My Heart To The Junkman” and “It’s Too Soon To know.” Matt The Cat focuses on many Dinah Washington singles that rarely receive airplay these days as well as “Long John Blues,” which continues to be heard and make heads turn. We leave Dinah in 1949, but will pick it up next week with part 3 of our mammoth “Juke In The Back” series on Dinah Washington. 

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Episode #594 – Dinah Washington, Pt. 1 – 1943-46

Air Week: September 20-26, 2021

Dinah Washington, Pt. 1 – 1943-46

Dinah Washington was more than just the “Queen of The Jukeboxes,” “Queen Of The Blues” and any other prestigious but vacant title you could pin on her. Dinah was the real deal. As one of the best selling artists of the 20th Century, Dinah was no pop sensation or flash in the pan. She was a consummate artist, who developed a playful, yet serious style of phrasing all her own. This week, Matt The Cat honors the great Dinah Washington with the first installment of a multi-part series on “The Queen.” Part 1 focuses on Dinah’s very first recordings for the Keynote label with members of Lionel Hampton’s band as well as the seldom heard Apollo Records sides with Lucky Thompson’s group. We’ll also dig on her early Mercury Records releases. “Evil Gal Blues” (Keynote) from 1944 was her first charting hit, making the Harlem Hit Parade Top Ten. She then followed that success up with another top tenner, “Salty Papa Blues.” You’ll also hear clips from Matt The Cat’s interview with Dinah’s biographer, Nadine Cahodas, who wrote the book, “Queen: The Life and Music of Dinah Washington.” Don’t miss the Fabulous Miss “D” on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

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Juke In The Back Promo

1940s & ’50s Rhythm & Blues

At the end of the Second World War, economics forced the big bands to trim their once great size and thus, the Jump Blues combo was born. Between 1946-1954, rhythm and blues laid the tracks for what was to become Rock n’ Roll. So how come, 70 years later, this vibrant and influential music is still so unknown to so many?

Matt The Cat is going to change that with the radio program, “Juke In The Back.” These were the records that you couldn’t hear on the jukebox in the front of the establishment. To hear all this great 1950s rhythm & blues, you had to go to “Juke In The Back.”

Juke In The Back: Demo The Show

 

Click below to hear a demo episode of “Juke In The Back.”