Skip to content


Episodes

Current Episode Located HERE

Archived Audio Of Past Episodes Located at TuneIn Radio

Episode #240

Air Week: December 8-14, 2014

1945 Rhythm Review1945: Jukebox Rhythm Review

This week, the “Juke In The Back” brings the jukebox into the spotlight as we journey back 70 years and dig on the top requested jukebox records from the entire year of 1945. This was a pivotal year for Rhythm and Blues Music as 1945 marked the beginning of a new sound in Black Music. As the war raged on, many of the African-American big bands found it hard to afford such large ensembles, so they slimed down to rhythm combos. Around the same time, blues singers were expanding their sound to go beyond just a guitar or piano accompaniment. They began adding rhythm sections and thus, Rhythm and Blues was born. 1945 marked the first year that this new style of music dominated the Black Community and the juke joints they patronized. 1945 was a strong year for jump blues cats like Louis Jordan, Joe Turner and Lionel Hampton. The blues cats faired well this year as Pvt. Cecil Gant had one of the year’s biggest hits with his self-penned, “I Wonder,” which was also successfully covered by Roosevelt Sykes and Louis Armstrong. Joe Liggins burst on the scene with “The Honeydripper,” the biggest selling record of the year and quite possibly the entire decade! Matt The Cat’s got a pocket full of nickels and he’s ready to warm up the “Juke In The Back,” so we can all dig that big beat jive of 1945!
1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall – Ink Spots and Ella Fitzgerald – Decca 1944
3. Somebody’s Gotta Go – Cootie Williams & His Orch – Majestic 1945
4. I Wonder – Pvt. Cecil Gant – Gilt Edge 1945
5. V-Day Stomp – The Four Clefs – Victor 1945
6. Tippin’ In – Erskine Hawkins & His Orch – Victor 1945
7. Strange Things Happening Every Day – Sister Rosetta Tharpe – Decca 1945
8. Rock Me Mamma – Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup – Bluebird 1945
9. Caldonia – Louis Jordan & His Tympany Five – Decca 1945
10. Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night – 5 Red Caps – Joe Davis 1945
11. Who Threw The Whiskey In The Well – Lucky Millinder & His Orch – Decca 1945
12. That’s The Stuff You Gotta Watch – Buddy Johnson & His Orch – Decca 1945
13. GREAT 78 – I Wonder – Roosevelt Sykes & His Piano – Bluebird 1945
14. The Honeydripper (part 1) – Joe Liggins & His Honeydrippers– Exclusive 1945
15. S. K. Blues Part 1 – Joe Turner with Pete Johnson’s All-Stars – National 1945
16. Beulah’s Boogie – Lionel Hampton & His Orch – Decca 1945
17. Things Have Changed – Big Maceo – Bluebird 1945
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #239

Air Week: December 1-7, 2014

LittleCaesarLittle Caesar

Today Harry “Little” Caesar is best remembered as an actor from movies and TV and the voice behind 1952’s “Goodbye Baby,” one of the strangest R&B hits of all-time. But the story of Little Caesar and his slow rise to fame is one of American folklore. He was raised by his steel working father after his mother died before his first birthday. While working various jobs to help support his family, Caesar got into trouble and spend six months in jail. After getting out of the military, he found himself on the West Coast with a budding musical career. He practically invented the story song, complete with acting between him and his platter co-star “Rusty” Russell. “Goodbye Baby” may have been his only national hit, topping out at #5, but there is so much more to Little Caesar and this week Matt The Cat is proud to bring this underrated R&B singer into the spotlight. We’ll dig on his recorded output for John Dolphin’s Recorded In Hollywood Label, RPM Records and Big Town Records from 1952-53 on the “Juke In The Back.” 

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Runaway – Jesse Stone & His Band – Atlantic 1954
3. But Officer! – Sonny Knight w/ Orch. – Aladdin 1953
4. Don’t Mention The Blues To Me – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
5. Talkin’ To Myself – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
6. Going Down To The River – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
7. Long Time Baby – Little Caesar – Recorded in Hollywood 1952
8. Goodbye Baby – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
9. If I Could See My Baby – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
10. Lying Woman – Little Caesar & Rusty – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
11. Here’s A Letter – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1953
12. Your Money Ain’t Long Enough – Little Caesar w/ The Que Martyn Orch – Recorded In Hollywood 1953
13. GREAT 78 – Move Me – Little Caesar – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
14. Atomic Love – Little Caesar w/ The Red Callender Sextet – Recorded In Hollywood 1953
15. Tried To Reason With You Baby – Little Caesar w/ Maxwell Davis & His Orch. – RPM 1953
16. Big Eyes – Little Caesar w/ Que Martyn’s Orch – Big Town 1953
17. What Kind Of Fool Is He – Little Caesar w/ Que Martyn’s Orch – Big Town 1953
18. Cadillac Baby – Little Caesar – Unissued
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #238

Air Week: November 24-30, 2014

Early Solomon BurkeSolomon Burke, The Early Years: 1955-60

This week we salute Solomon Burke, the “King of Rock n’ Soul” and the “Juke In The Back” is loaded with his very first recordings from 1955 to 1960.  As a teenager in Philadelphia, Burke was recording for Apollo Records in NYC, but none of his nine Apollo singles charted.  He then cut two singles for the Singular Label before his fortunes turned around and he began recording with Atlantic Records.  You won’t hear anything that will blow you mind from Burke’s early recordings, but they all have a quality that would stick with him for the rest of his career.  Hear how the “Bishop Of Soul” evolved into the giant he became on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Too Much Lovin’ – The “5” Royales – Apollo 1953
3. Be Baba Leba – Helen Humes With Bill Doggett Octet – Philo 1945
4. Just Out Of Reach (Of My Two Open Arms) – Solomon Burke – Atlantic 1961
5. Christmas Presents From Heaven – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1955
6. Why Do Me That Way – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1956
7. To Thee – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1956
8. No Man Walks Alone – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1956
9. A Picture Of You – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1956
10. This Is It – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1957
11. For You And You Alone – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1957
12. My Heart Is A Chapel – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1958
13. Great 78 – Don’t Cry – Solomon Burke – Apollo 1958
14. It’s All Right – Solomon Burke – Singular 1959
15. This Little Ring – Solomon Burke – Singular 1960 & Mala 1960
16. Don’t Blame It On Me – Fats Domino – Imperial 1956
17. Don’t Feel Sorry For Me – Jimmy Beasley – Modern 1956
18. Flying Home – Lionel Hampton & His Orch. – Decca 1942
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #237

Air Week: November 17-23, 2014

Titus TurnerUnderrated R&B Pioneers: Titus Turner & Buddy Lucas

The “Juke In The Back” spotlights two extremely underrated R&B pioneers this week: Titus Turner and saxophonist Buddy Lucas.  Turner recorded some amazing R&B sides for Regal, Okeh, Wing, King and many other top labels, but he just couldn’t score a sizable hit on his own.  Today he is mostly remembered as a songwriter and his songs were hits by the likes of Little Willie John (“All Around The World,” “Leave My Kitten Alone”) and Ray Charles (“Sticks And Stones,” “Get On The Right Track”).  Buddy Lucas is mostly remembered today as a great session player, but he scored a few hits under his own name in the early 1950s for the Jubilee Label.  Matt The Cat tells their stories and plays some of their greatest sides.  Hear what you’ve been missing on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Oop Shoop – Shirley Gunter & The Queens – Flair 1954
3. Big Foot May – Hal Paige – Atlantic 1953
4. Stop Trying To Make A Fool Of Me – Titus Turner – Regal 1951
5. Got So Much Trouble – Titus Turner – Okeh 1952
6. Jambalaya – Titus Turner – Okeh 1952
7. Livin’ In Misery – Titus Turner – Okeh 1953
8. (Going Down To) Big Mary’s – Titus Turner – Okeh 1953
9. My Lonely Room – Titus Turner – Okeh 1954
10. All Around The World – Titus Turner – Wing 1955
11. Sweet And Slow – Titus Turner – Wing 1955
12. Have Mercy Baby – Titus Turner – King 1957
13. GREAT 78 – Big John – Titus Turner – Wing 1955
14. Diane – Buddy Lucas & His Band Of Tomorrow – Jubilee 1952
15. Heavenly Father – Edna McGriff With Buddy Lucas & His Band Of Tomorrow – Jubilee 1952
16. My Pinch Hitter – Buddy Lucas Feat. Almeda Stewart – Groove 1954
17. 7-11 – The Gone All Stars Featuring Buddy Lucas – Gone 1958
18. Night Train – The Buddy Lucas Band – Vim 1960
19. I Will Return – The Cobras – Modern 1955
20. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #236

Air Week: November 10-16, 2014

Billy StewartBilly Stewart: The Early Years

Many 1960s soul legends had their start in 1950s R&B and this week, the “JukeIn The Back” takes a listen to Billy Stewart’s early records for the Chess and Okeh labels. You can really hear Stewart’s distinctive singing style develop on his early recordings with Bo Diddley’s band providing the musical backing and the DC vocal group The Marquees (Marvin Gaye was a member) singing behind him. We’ll also spend a few days in jail as Matt The Cat spins a few “prison song” 78s. There are other surprises as well, so don’t miss this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Rockin’ At Cosmo’s – Lee Allen – Aladdin 1956
3. Mary Lou – Young Jesse & The Cadets – Modern 1955
4. Love Is Stange – Bo Diddley – Prev. Unreleased 1956
5. Billy’s Blues Part 1 – Billy Stewart – Chess 1956
6. Billy’s Blues Part 2 – Billy Stewart – Chess 1956
7. Billy’s Heartache – Billy Stewart – Okeh 1957
8. Baby, You’re My Only Love – Billy Stewart – Okeh 1957
9. Fat Boy – Billy Stewart – Chess 1962
10. Shirley – The Rainbows – Pilgrim 1956
11. Ten Days In Jail – The Robins – RCA Victor 1953
12. Jailhouse Blues – Andre Williams – Fortune 1958
13. A Prisoner’s Prayer – The Prisonaires – Sun 1953
14. GREAT 78 – Please Mr. Jailer – Wynona Carr – Specialty 1956
15. Prison Blues – T-Bone Walker – Capitol 1947
16. Need Your Love So Bad – Little Willie John – King 1955
17. Little Maiden – The Chords – Cat 1954
18. Baby It’s You – The Spaniels – Vee-Jay 1953
19. Three Hours Past Midnight – Johnny “Guitar” Watson – RPM 1956
20. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #235

Air Week: November 3-9, 2014

The CadillacsThe Cadillacs 

The Cadillacs began their journey in 1953 as The Carnations and when they changed their name they helped usher in a new era of automobile names for R&B vocal groups. Lead tenor Earl “Speedo” Carroll and bass singer Bobby Phillips forged a friendship that would carry on from their days growing up in Harlem until the day each of them passed on. While together, The Cadillacs produced some of the coolest jump tunes from the classic “Speedo” to the jazzy “Down The Road” and the killer “No Chance.” As a ballad group, Speedo and the boys recorded the version of the immortal “Gloria” that all other vocal groups are measured against as well as other gorgeous tunes like “You Are” and “The Girl I Love.” Matt The Cat features an interview with Earl Carroll himself, so that he can tell The Cadillacs story in his own words. We lost Earl Carroll and a little piece of early rock n’ roll on November 25, 2012, but Speedo will never be forgotten in the hearts of those who dig REAL vocal group harmony.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Speedo – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
3. Earl Carroll Interview #1 
4. Gloria – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
5. I Wonder Why – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
6. Wishing Well – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
7. No Chance – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
8. Earl Carroll Interview #2 
9. Speedo – The Cadillacs – LIVE on Alan Freed’s Rock & Roll Dance Party 1956 
10. Down The Road – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
11. Earl Carroll Interview #3 
12. You Are – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
13. GREAT 78 – I Want To Know About Love – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
14. Zoom – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
16. Woe Is Me – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
17. The Girl I Love – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
18. Speedo Is Back – The Cadillacs – Josie 1958 
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #234

Air Week: October 27-November 2, 2014

Richard BerryRichard Berry

Richard Berry is truly one of the unsung heroes of early rhythm & blues and rock n’ roll. That he wrote and recorded the original version of “Louie Louie” is only scratching the surface of this renaissance man of R&B. As a teenager at LA’s Jefferson High School, he was a founding member of The Flairs, one of the first great vocal groups to hit the LA Scene. From there, Berry recorded some solo sides for the Flair, Modern, RPM and Flip labels. Matt The Cat takes a look and listen to Richard Berry’s early catalog, digging out some of his greatest sides from his first record with The Flairs to the solo ballad, “One Little Prayer,” his uncredited vocals on The Robins’ “Riot In Cell Block #9″ and Etta James’ “The Wallflower (Roll With Me Henry)” to the classic “Have Love Will Travel.” Plus, we’ll hear Richard Berry’s story in HIS own words through an interview conducted by former DJ James Austin from the mid-1980s (used with permission). In the interview, Berry gives a detailed history of how “Louie Louie” was inspired, written and received. So catch an intimate visit with the late Richard Berry, a rhythm & blues icon, on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Speedo – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
3. Earl Carroll Interview #1 
4. Gloria – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
5. I Wonder Why – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
6. Wishing Well – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
7. No Chance – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
8. Earl Carroll Interview #2 
9. Speedo – The Cadillacs – LIVE on Alan Freed’s Rock & Roll Dance Party 1956 
10. Down The Road – The Cadillacs – Josie 1955 
11. Earl Carroll Interview #3 
12. You Are – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
13. GREAT 78 – I Want To Know About Love – The Cadillacs – Josie 1954 
14. Zoom – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
16. Woe Is Me – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
17. The Girl I Love – The Cadillacs – Josie 1956 
18. Speedo Is Back – The Cadillacs – Josie 1958 
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #233

Air Week: October 20-26, 2014

Halloween R&B w/ Screamin' Jay HawkinsHalloween Rhythm & Blues

Matt The Cat experiences some paranormal rhythms coming out of his “Juke In The Back” as we celebrate the truly spooky, sinister and down-right crazy sounds of a vintage rhythm & blues Halloween. Eugene Fox meets the devil, The Hollywood Flames take us to Frankenstein’s Den and Bill Doggett throws a Monster’s Party. It’s a treat, not a trick to hear an alternate take of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’ 1956 classic, “I Put A Spell On You,” with EXTRA screaming and a killer sax solo payed by Sam “The Man” Taylor. So clear your voodoo calendar and dig the sounds from the outer bounds on this week’s Halloween edition of the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Voodoo Voodoo – Lavern Baker – Atlantic 1961
3. King Kong – Big T Tyler – Aladdin 1957
4. Frankenstein’s Den – Hollywood Flames – Ebb 1958
5. Castin’ My Spell – The Johnny Otis Show – Capitol 1959
6. Black Cat Blues – Lowell Fulson – Down Beat 1948
7. Monster’s Party – Bill Doggett – King 1959
8. Peak-A-Boo – The Cadillacs – Josie 1958
9. I Put A Spell On You (Alt. Take)– Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – Okeh 1956
10. Screamin’ Ball (At Dracula Hall) – The Duponts – Roulette 1958
11. Bo Meets The Monster – Bo Diddley – Checker 1958
12. Legend Of Sleepy Hollow – The Monotones – Argo 1958
13. GREAT 78 – Witchcraft – The Spiders – Imperial 1955
14. Nightmare – Big Mama Thornton – Peacock 1953
15. Sinner’s Dream – Eugene Fox – Checker 1954
16. Cadillac Funeral – Peppermint Harris – Cash 1955
17. Alligator Wine – Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – Okeh 1958
18. Halloween Spooks – Lambert, Hendricks & Ross – Columbia 1962
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #232

Air Week: October 13-19, 2014

Ray CharlesRay Charles, Part 4: 1957-58

This week, the “Juke In The Back” presents the final part of a 4 part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. In part 4, we’ll dig on the A and B sides of every Ray Charles single release on Atlantic Records from the summer of ’57 through the very end of ’58. This period is truly the cradle of Soul Music, as Ray continues to mesh church-like feeling with secular subject matter. His use of The Raylettes grows and he even gives Mary Ann Fisher (who was not a Raylette) a solo vocal on “What Kind Of Man Are You.” We’ll spin the hits, “Swannee River Rock (Talkin’ ‘Bout That River),” “Rockhouse, Pt. 2″ and “(Night Time Is) The Right Time” as well as many should have been hits. Some of Ray Charles’ greatest live recordings from this period will also be highlighted to showcase Ray’s live performances as the road was just as important as the studio during this point in his career. We’ll also hear a few outtakes from the recording session that yielded “The Right Time.” Matt The Cat digs the end of Ray’s first ten years in music as “Juke In The Back”‘s in-depth look at the early work of Ray Charles comes to a close.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Swanee River Rock – Ray Charles w/ Chorus & Orch – Atlantic 1957
3. I Want A Little Girl – Ray Charles w/ Chorus & Orch– Atlantic 1957
4. Talkin’ ‘Bout You – Ray Charles w/ Orch & Chorus– Atlantic 1958
5. What Kind Of Man Are You – Ray Charles w/ Orch & Chorus– Atlantic 1958
6. Yes Indeed – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1958
7. I Had A Dream – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1958
8. You Be My Baby – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1958
9. Rockhouse, Pt. 1 – Ray Charles w/ His Orch – Atlantic 1958
10. Rockhouse Pt. 2 – Ray Charles w/ His Orch – Atlantic 1958
11. Tell All The World About You – Ray Charles w/ The Raylettes – Atlantic 1958
12. The Right Time (Outtake and single edit) – Ray Charles w/ The Raylettes – Atlantic 1958
13. GREAT 78 – My Bonnie – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1958
14. A Fool For You (Live At Newport, 1958) – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1958
15. I’ve Got A Woman (Live At Newport, 1958) – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1958
16. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

 

Episode #231

Air Week: October 6-12, 2014

Ray CharlesRay Charles, Pt. 3: 1954-57

This week, the “Juke In The Back” presents part 3 of a 4 part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. In part 3, we look at every one of Ray’s Atlantic single releases from December, 1954 to June, 1957. After a long stint in New Orleans, playing with Guitar Slim’s band and arranging the session that yielded the #1 smash, “The Things That I Used To Do,” Ray has his own #1 hit with “I’ve Got A Woman,” the song that introduced the world to the new genre of Soul Music. By 1955, the Ray Charles “sound” was finally solidified. He would score 3 #1 R&B hits in the span of just one year. Some of Ray’s most important records were recorded during this period, like the Gospel-tinged “It’s All Right” and “Hallelujah I Love Her So” as well as the blues classic, “Blackjack.” The addition of The Cookies, singing a churchy backup on “Drown In My Own Tears” and “Lonely Avenue” only serve to expand Ray’s sound. Next week’s show will highlight Ray Charles’ live recordings and single releases through 1957 and ’58.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. I’ve Got A Woman – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1954
3. Come Back Baby – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1954
4. A Fool For You – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1955
5. This Little Girl Of Mine – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1955
6. Blackjack – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1955
7. Greenbacks – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1955
8. Mary Ann – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1956
9. Drown In My Own Tears – Ray Charles & His Band – Atlantic 1956
10. Hallelujah I Love Her So – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1956
11. What Would I Do Without You – Ray Charles – Atlantic 1956
12. Lonely Avenue – Ray Charles His Orch & Chorus– Atlantic 1956
13. GREAT 78 – Leave My Woman Alone – Ray Charles His Orch & Chorus– Atlantic 1956
14. I Want To Know – Ray Charles His Orch & Chorus – Atlantic 1957
15. Ain’t That Love – Ray Charles His Orch & Chorus – Atlantic 1957
16. It’s All Right – Ray Charles with Chorus & Orch – Atlantic 1957
17. Get On The Right Track Baby – Ray Charles with Chorus & Orch – Atlantic 1957
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946 

Episode #230

Air Week: September 29-October 5, 2014

Ray CharlesRay Charles, Pt. 2: 1952-54

This week, the “Juke In The Back” presents part 2 of a four part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. We pick Ray’s musical story up in 1952, just as Atlantic Record acquires his recording contract from Jack Lauderdale’s Swing Time Records for under $3000. Atlantic now has a very talented musician that has yet to sell enough records to be a headliner. It’s co-founder Ahmet Ertegun’s goal to help Ray Charles find his own “voice” and show the world what he has to offer. The first 2 years at Atlantic are a bit rocky, but 1954 shows promise as Ray returns to the national R&B chart after a 2 year hiatus. “It Should’ve Been Me” and “Don’t You Know” both make the R&B Top 10 and start Ray on a long road of hit records. Matt The Cat plays the A and B side of every one of Ray’s singles released from September, ’52 to August, ’54. We’ll also dig on some rehearsal tapes from early 1953, which show the early stages of Ray’s classics “Mess Around” and “It Should’ve Been Me.” Next week’s show will highlight Ray Charles’ mid-’50s output for Atlantic.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Ahmet Ertegun on Ray Charles Interview with Matt The Cat
3. The Midnight Hour – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1952
4. Roll With My Baby – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1952
5. The Sun’s Gonna Shine Again – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
6. Jumpin’ In The Mornin’ – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
7. Mess Around – Ahmet Ertegun & Ray Charles – Rehearsal Tape 1953
8. Mess Around – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
9. Funny (But I Still Love You) – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
10. Funny (But I Still Love You) – Ray Charles – Rehearsal Tape 1953
11. Feelin’ Sad – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
12. Heartbreaker – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1953
13. GREAT 78 – Sinner’s Prayer – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1954
14. It Should’ve Been Me – Ray Charles & Ahmet Ertegun – Rehearsal Tape 1953
15. It Should’ve Been Me – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1954
16. Losing Hand – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1954
17. Don’t You Know – Ray Charles & His Orch – Atlantic 1954
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #229

Air Week: September 22-28, 2014

RayCharles1Ray Charles, Pt. 1: 1948-1952

This week, the “Juke In The Back” begins a four part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. Born in poverty during The Great Depression, the young Ray Charles Robinson overcame the tragedy of losing his younger brother at age 5, going completely blind at age 7 and losing his mother at age 15. These experiences forced Ray to step up his musical game, cut out on his own and make something of himself. He moved to Seattle in 1947 and began recording with Jack Lauderdale’s LA-based Down Beat Records in 1949. His first single hit #2 on the national R&B charts. By 1951, he was back on the charts with 2 more hit singles for Swing Time Records. This week, Matt The Cat takes a look at Ray’s early career BEFORE he hooked up with Ahmet Ertegun and Atlantic Records in ’52. Next week, we’ll look at Ray’s early Atlantic recordings and eventually, we’ll take Ray Charles’ story up to 1958. Some great early sides by Brotha Ray are jumpin’ out of this week’s “Juke In The Back.”
1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947

2. Confession Blues – The Maxin Trio – Down Beat 1949
3. I Love You, I Love You (I Will Not Let You Go) – The Maxin Trio – Down Beat 1949
4. Blues Before Sunrise – The Maxim Trio – Down Beat 1949
5. How Long Blues – The Maxim Trio – Down Beat 1949
6. I’ve Had My Fun – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1949
7. Th’ Ego Song – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1949
8. Late In The Evening Blues – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1949
9. I’ll Do Anything But Work – Ray Charles – Swing Time 1949
10. All To Myself – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1950
11. Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1951
12. Kissa Me Baby – Ray Charles & Orch – Swing Time 1952
13. GREAT 78 – Lonely Boy – Ray Charles Trio – Swing Time 1951
14. Baby Let Me Hear You Call My Name – Ray Charles – Jax 1952
15. Walkin’ and Talkin’ – Ray Charles – Rockin’ 1952
16. Misery In My Heart – Ray Charles – Swing Time 1953
17. Ray Charles w/ Ahmet Ertegun at a 1953 Rehearsal for Atlantic Records
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #228

Air Week: September 15-21, 2014

The Penguins

The Penguins’ “Earth Angel” was the first rhythm & blues song to crossover into the pop world in such a big way that it announced the beginning of what was to be called “rock n’ roll.”

“Earth Angel” remains one of the most eduring songs in the history of recorded music and yet when it was released in late 1954, it received very little promotion from the record company. It’s a rare example of a song that became a huge hit based on its own merits. The Penguins’ lead vocalist, Cleve Duncan, who passed away on November 6, 2012 while waiting in line to vote, talks with Matt The Cat about The Penguins’ beginnings, “Earth Angel” and the 1950s music scene. Cleve Duncan tells the Penguins’ story in his own words, while Matt The Cat digs deep into the archives to pull out some surprises, like both of the Penguins’ live performances from a 1956 Alan Freed show. Grab a few nickels, as we pay tribute to one of LA’s great vocal groups while the juke jumps with the best of The Penguins.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Earth Angel – The Penguins – LIVE on Alan Freed’s Rock n’ Roll Dance Party – 1956
3. Ice – The Penguins – LIVE on Alan Freed’s Rock n’ Roll Dance Party – 1956
4. Interview With Cleve Duncan #1 – Matt The Cat
5. Hey Senorita – The Penguins – Dootone 1954 
6. Love Will Make Your Mind Go Wild – The Penguins – Dootone 1954 
7. Ookey Ook – The Penguins – Dootone 1954 
8. Interview With Cleve Duncan #2 – Matt The Cat
9. Don’t Do It – The Penguins – Mercury 
10. Be Mine Or Be A Fool – The Penguins – Mercury 1955 
11. Promises, Promises, Promises – The Penguins – Mercury 1955
12. Interview With Cleve Duncan #3 – Matt The Cat
13. Pledge Of Love – The Penguins – Atlantic 1957 
14. GREAT 78 – Dealer Of Dreams – The Penguins – Wing 1956 
15. Let Me Make Up Your Mind – The Penguins – Dooto 1958
16. Interview With Cleve Duncan #4 – Matt The Cat
17. Memories Of El Monte – The Penguins – Original Sound 1963 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #227

Air Week: September 8-14, 2014

Little Esther

Esther Mae Jones is one of the First Ladies of R&B, yet her 1950s output under the name Little Esther is sadly overlooked. Little Esther was discovered by bandleader Johnny Otis in 1949, when she was only 14 years old. Otis immediately added her to his musical ensemble. He had scored a few hits before, but nothing could have prepared Otis for his HUGE 1950 breakthrough record, “Double Crossing Blues,” featuring Little Esther and The Robins. Otis and his group dominated the R&B lists in 1950, scoring three #1 hit records and six R&B top tens, all featuring Little Esther. This week, Matt The Cat examines Little Esther’s records with Otis as well as her duets with The Dominoes, Bobby Nunn, Little Willie Littlefield and her many solo sides for the Federal and Savoy labels. Esther Jones would gain much recognition as Esther Phillips in the 1960s and ’70s, but as a teen in the 1950s, Little Esther laid the groundwork for musical genius. The spotlight shines bright on Little Esther, this week on the “Juke In The Back.” This is the “soul that came BEFORE rock n’ roll.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Mean Ole Gal – Little Esther with Johnny Otis & His Orch – Modern 1950
3. Double Crossing Blues – Johnny Otis Quintette – Savoy 1950
4. Misery – Little Esther w/ The Johnny Otis Orch. – Savoy 1950 
5. Mistrustin’ Blues – Little Esther and Mel Walker w/ The Johnny Otis Orch. – Savoy 1950 
6. Cupid’s Boogie – Little Esther and Mel Walker w/ The Johnny Otis Orch. – Savoy 1950 
7. Deceivin’ Blues – Little Esther and Mel Walker w/ The Johnny Otis Orch. – Savoy 1950
8. Wedding Boogie – Johnny Otis Congregation – Savoy 1950 
9. The Deacon Moves In – Little Esther w/ Earle Warren Orch. – Federal 1951
10. I’m A Bad, Bad Girl – Little Esther w/ Earle Warren Orch. – Federal 1951
11. Heart To Heart – Little Esther & The Dominoes w/ Earle Warren Orch. – Federal 1951
12. Ring-A-Ding Doo – Little Esther w/ The J. & O. Orch. – Federal 1952
13. GREAT 78 – Aged & Mellow Blues – Little Esther – Federal 1952
14. Saturday Night Daddy – Little Esther & Bobby Nunn – Federal 1952
15. Turn The Lamps Down Low – Little Esther & Little Willie Littlefield – Federal 1953
16. Cherry Wine – Little Esther – Federal 1953 
17. You Can Bet Your Life – Little Esther – Savoy 1956
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #226

Air Week: September 1-7, 2014

Rare 78rpm ShellacBack Of The Box: Rare 78rpm Shellac

This week, Matt The Cat digs deep inside the back of the “Juke In The Back” to dust off some 78rpm shellac plattahs that never get played. It’s a great opportunity to hear rare records by Edith Mackey, Dillard Croon Jr. & The Croon Brothers and Little Mr. Midnight. We’ll also load the juke with Albert Collins’ first single for the Kangaroo Label as well as Sollie McElroy’s first record after leaving The Flamingos. Have you ever heard of Gladys De Vore & The Flips? Dig on their 1956 single for Sapphire Records. We’ll also throw in a Wynonie “Mr. Blues” Harris side just for good measure. So get ready to jump, jive and wail to some seldom heard gems on this week’s “Juke In The Back.” 

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Have You Seen My Baby – Choker Campbell & His Band – Atlantic 1954
3. She Walked Right In – Morris Pejoe & His Band – Atomic-H 1959
4. Skillet’s Gonna Fry – Edith Mackey – Vee-Jay 1956
5. Come Back To Me – The Teardrops – Sampson 1953
6. Drinkin’ By Myself – Wynonie (Mr. Blues) Harris – Bullet 1946
7. Poppa Stoppa – Thelma Baxter & The Durham Brothers – Cosmopolitan 1954 (?)
8. Ebony Chant – Danny Overbea w/ King Kolax & His Orch. – Checker 1953
9. Straighten Up Baby – Willard Harris & The Czars of Rhythm – Ekko 1956
10. Let’s Get Together And Make Some Love – Jimmy Lewis & His Band – Atlantic 1951
11. Collins Shuffle – Albert Collins & His Rhythm Rockets – Kangaroo 1958
12. Yes Ma’am – Gladys De Vore & The Flips – Sapphire 1956
13. GREAT 78 – I Ain’t Guilty – The Crawford Brothers – Aladdin 1957
14. Big Foot Mae – Hal Paige – Atlantic 1953
15. Dearest Darling – The Chimes – Royal Roost 1953
16. Pardon My Tears – The Moroccos – United 1955
17. It’s You I Love – Dillard Croon Jr & The Croon Brothers – Vee-Jay 1958
18. Four O’Clock Blues – Little Mr. Midnight – Regal 1950
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #225

Air Week: August 25-31, 2014

Lloyd PriceLloyd Price: 1952-53

The legendary Lloyd Price joins Matt The Cat on the “Juke In The Back” this week to discuss his early career on Specialty Records and the recording of “Lawdy Miss Clawdy.” Lloyd paints a picture of New Orleans during the early 1950s that you won’t hear anywhere else. Mr. Price also gives us the “story behind the story” on how he wrote “Just Because” and how his cousin Larry Williams tried to take it away from him. His greatest records from 1952-53 are also featured on this very special edition of the “Juke In The Back.” 

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. She’s My Baby – Fats Domino – Imperial 1950
3. That’s How You Got Killed Before – Dave Bartholomew – Imperial 1950
4. Lloyd Price Interview 1 – Lloyd Price & Matt The Cat
5. Lawdy Miss Clawdy – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1952
6. Mailman Blues – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1952
7. Lloyd Price Interview 2 – Lloyd Price & Matt The Cat
8. Ooh, Ooh, Ooh – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1952
9. Restless Heart – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1952
10. Ain’t It A Shame? – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953
11. Tell Me Pretty Baby – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953
12. Great 78 – Where You At? – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953
13. What’s The Matter Now? – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953
14. Lloyd Price Interview 3 – Lloyd Price & Matt The Cat
15. So Long – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953
16. Lloyd Price Interview 4 – Lloyd Price & Matt The Cat
17. Just Because – Lloyd Price – KRC 1956 & ABC/Paramount 1957
18. I Didn’t Want To Do It – The Spiders – Imperial 1954
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #224

Air Week: August 18-24, 2014

Howlin' WolfHowlin’ Wolf: The Early Years

This week, the “Juke In The Back” focuses on the great Howlin’ Wolf’s earliest recordings.  Before he became a huge star on Chess Records in Chicago, Wolf was a local celebrity in Memphis, recording with Sam Phillips (before Phillips started Sun Records).  Matt The Cat spins Wolf’s demo acetates and his 1951 recordings, some of which Phillips sold to RPM Records in LA and others he sold to Chess in Chicago.  Howlin’ Wolf was a mammoth man in both voice and stature and you’ll hear how it all began on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Pachuko Hop – Chuck Higgins & His Mellotones – Combo 1952
3. New Orleans Blues – Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers – Exclusive 1947
4. Cherry Red – Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson & His Orch – Mercury 1946
5. Howlin’ Wolf Talks, No. 1 – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess Box 1991
6. Baby Ride With Me (Ridin’ In The Moonlight) (Demo Acetate) – Howlin’ Wolf – 1951
7. Riding In The Moonlight – Howlin’ Wolf – RPM 1951
8. How Many More Years (Demo Acetate) – Howlin’ Wolf – 1951
9. How Many More Years – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1951
10. Moanin’ At Midnight – Howlin’ Wolf – RPM 1951
11. Moanin’ At Midnight – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1951
12. GREAT 78 – Mr. Highway Man – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1952
13. Passing By Blues – Howlin’ Wolf – RPM 1951

14. Crying At Daybreak – Howlin’ Wolf – RPM 1951
15. Wolf Is At Your Door – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1952
16. Howlin’ Wolf Boogie – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1952
17. Why – Shirley Gunter & The Queens – Flair 1955
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #223

Air Week: August 11-17, 2014

The Excello Records StoryThe Excello Records Story

Drop a nickel in the ol’ Rockola Juke as Matt The Cat dedicates the entire hour to the great little Nashville R&B label, Excello Records. Ernie Young started Excello as a sister label to his Nashboro Label and both labels were housed in his Ernie’s Record Mart building in Nashville. For a city mostly known for Country Music, Nashville sure had a lot of great R&B acts and we’re going to hear some of ‘em this week. From The Marigolds to Arthur Gunter to Slim Harpo, Excello’s fantastic R&B catalog is in the spotlight on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Step By Step – The Boyer Brothers – Excello 1952

3. Wail Daddy – The Charlie Dowell Orch. With Willie Lee Patton – Excello 1953
4. Down South In Birmingham – Del Thorne & Her Trio – Excello 1953
5. Skip’s Boogie – Kid King’s Combo – Excello 1953
6. Banana Split – Kid King’s Combo – Excello 1953
7. Drive Soldier Drive – “Little Maxie” Bailey – Excello 1953
8. I’m Your Country Man – Shy Guy Douglas – Excello 1953
9. Drivin’ Down The Highway – The Blue Flamers – Excello 1954
10. Baby Let’s Play House – Arthur Gunter – Excello 1954
11. It’s Love Baby (24 Hours A Day) – Earl Gaines With Louis Brooks & His Hi-Toppers – Excello 1955
12. Rollin’ Stone – The Marigolds – Excello 1955
13. GREAT 78 – Congo Mambo – Guitar Gable – Excello 1956
14. Calling All Cows – The Blues Rockers – Excello 1956
15. My Mumblin’ Baby – Rudy Green – Excello 1956
16. Pleadin’ For Love – Larry Birdsong – Excello 1956
17. Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels – Excello 1956
18. Little Darlin’ – The Gladiolas – Excello 1957
19. I’m A King Bee – Slim Harpo – Excello 1957
20. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #222

Air Week: August 4-10, 2014

FlamingosThe Flamingos, Pt. 3 – 1957-59

Terry Johnson of The Flamingos joins Matt The Cat this week as the “Juke In The Back” jumps and grooves with part three of our three part feature on The Flamingos, one of the most influential and best remembered vocal groups of the 1950s. In part three, we’ll dig on both sides of all The Flamingos single releases for the Decca and End labels covering 1957-59. With the additions of guitarist, arranger and vocalist Terry Johnson and vocalist Tommy Hunt in 1957, The Flamingos’ music takes on a heavy pop influence. Decca doesn’t provide much promotion, so their 3 original Decca releases flop. Once on George Goldner’s End Label, their fortunes turn as “Lovers Never Say Goodbye” hit the chart at the beginning of 1959. They quickly follow it up with the smash standard, “I Only Have Eyes For You,” which crosses over to the Pop Chart. Terry Johnson tells Matt The Cat the story behind those hits as well as how he came to join the group. He’s still performing as The Flamingos today. Don’t miss the final chapter of The Flamingos on this week’s “Juke In The Back.” 

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Interview with Terry Johnson on “The Ladder Of Love”

3. The Ladder Of Love – The Flamingos – Decca 1957
4. Let’s Make Up – The Flamingos – Decca 1957
5. Helpless – The Flamingos – Decca 1957
6. My Faith In You – The Flamingos – Decca 1957
7. Where Mary Go – The Flamingos – Decca 1958
8. The Rock and Roll March – The Flamingos – Decca 1958
9. Interview with Terry Johnson on “Lovers Never Say Goodbye”
10. Lovers Never Say Goodbye – The Flamingos – End 1958
11. That Love Is You – The Flamingos – End 1958
12. But Not For Me – The Flamingos – End 1959
13. I Shed A Tear At Your Wedding – The Flamingos – End 1959
14. GREAT 78 – At The Prom – The Flamingos – End 1959
15. Love Walked In – The Flamingos – End 1959
16. Interview with Terry Johnson on “I Only Have Eyes For You”
17. I Only Have Eyes For You – The Flamingos  – End 1959
18. Goodnight Sweetheart – The Flamingos – End 1959
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #221

Air Week: July 28-August 3, 2014

FlamingosThe Flamingos, Pt. 2 – 1954-56

The “Juke In The Back” jumps and grooves this week as Matt The Cat presents part 2 of a three part feature on The Flamingos, one of the most influential and best remembered vocal groups of the 1950s. In part two, we’ll dig on both sides of all The Flamingos single releases for the Parrot and Checker labels from the end of ’54 to the end of ’56. During this time, the group’s lead tenor Sollie McElroy resigned, but they gained a fantastic lead voice in Nate Nelson. In ’56, while recording for Chess’ Checker subsidiary, The Flamingos scored their first two national R&B hits when “I’ll Be Home” hit number 5 and “A Kiss From Your Lips” topped out at number 12. By the end of ’56, members Zeke Carey and Johnny Carter were drafted and this marked another period of great change for the group. Part 3 will focus on 1957-59 with guitarist and former Whispers’ vocalist Terry Johnson joining the group. Matt The Cat will highlight an interview with Johnson for a first hand account of what went on in one of the greatest vocal groups of all time. Grab some nickels and dig on the fantabulous Flamingos, this week on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. On My Merry Way – The Flamingos – Parrot 1954

3. I Really Don’t Want To Know – The Flamingos – Parrot 1954
4. Get With It – The Flamingos – Parrot 1954
5. I’m Yours – The Flamingos – Parrot 1955
6. Ko Ko Mo – The Flamingos – Parrot 1955
7. When – The Flamingos – Checker 1955
8. (Chick A Boom) That’s My Baby – The Flamingos – Checker 1955
9. Please Come Back Home – The Flamingos – Checker 1955                                              
10. I Want To Love You – The Flamingos – Checker 1955
11. I’ll Be Home – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
12. Need Your Love – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
13. GREAT 78 – Just For A Kick – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
14. A Kiss From Your Lips – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
15. The Vow – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
16. Shilly Dilly – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
17. Would I Be Crying – The Flamingos – Checker 1956
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #220

Air Week: July 21-27, 2014

The FlamingosThe Flamingos, Pt. 1 – 1953-54

The “Juke In The Back” jumps and grooves this week as Matt The Cat begins a 3 part feature on The Flamingos, one of the most influential and best remembered vocal groups of the 1950s. In part one, we’ll dig on both sides of all six single releases that the Flamingos had on Chance Records in 1953-54. These are The Flamingos very first recordings and most of them feature the amazing Sollie McElroy on lead tenor. The Flamingos would become known as one of the greatest and smoothest sounding R&B vocal groups of the 1950s and would achieve cross-over success by the end of the decade. In part 2, we’ll focus on their mid-career with their Parrot and Checker singles and then in part 3, their Decca and End recordings will be spotlighted. Dig The Flamingos on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. How Can You Leave A Man Like This – Lavern Baker – Atlantic 1953
3. Tryin’ To Get To You – The Eagles – Mercury 1954
4. Someday, Someway – Flamingos – Chance 1953
5. If I Can’t Have You – Flamingos – Chance 1953
6. That’s My Desire – Flamingos – Chance 1953
7. Hurry Home Baby – Flamingos – Chance 1953
8. Golden Teardrops – Flamingos – Chance 1953
9. Carried Away – Flamingos – Chance 1953
10. Plan For Love – Flamingos – Chance 1953
11. You Ain’t Ready – Flamingos – Chance 1953
12. Cross Over The Bridge – Flamingos – Chance 1954
13. GREAT 78 – September Song – Flamingos – Chance UNRELEASED
14. Listen To My Plea – Flamingos – Chance 1954
15. Blues In A Letter – Flamingos – Chance 1954
16. Jump Children – Flamingos – Chance 1954
17. Dream Of A Lifetime – Flamingos – Parrot 1954
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #219

Air Week: July 14-20, 2014

Motown Artists Before Motown (The Miracles)Motown Artists Before Motown

The entire “Juke In The Back” this week features Motown’s biggest acts, BEFORE there even was a Motown Records and before those acts were household names. Matt The Cat spins the earliest records by The Miracles (1958), The Four Tops (1956), The Supremes (as The Primettes) and many more. Marvin Gaye’s first recordings with The Marquees are discussed with fellow group member, Reese Palmer. You’ll get the real story behind the story as to how DC’s Marquees became the “new” Moonglows as well as hear the original Bo Diddley produced version of the Marquees’ “Wyatt Earp,” which Okeh Records wouldn’t release. All this and more on this week’s, “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Whistle My Love – The Pips – Brunswick 1958

3. Every Beat Of My Heart – The Pips – Huntom 1961 & Vee-Jay 1961
4. Could It Be You? – Four Tops – Chess 1956
5. Woke Up This Morning – Four Tops – Chess 1956 – PREV UNRELEASED
6. Got A Job – The Miracles – End 1958
7. Money – The Miracles – End 1958
8. Tears Of Sorrow – The Primettes (The Supremes) – Lu Pine 1960
9. I’ll Let You Know – Del-Phis (Martha & The Vandellas)– Checkmate 1961
10. You – Eddie Holland – Mercury 1958
11. Moments To Remember You By – The Romeos (Lamont Dozier) – Fox 1957, Atco 1958
12. Shock – Briant Holland (Brian Holland) – Kudo 1958
13. Roll On – Futuretones (Edwin Starr) – Tress 1957
14. GREAT 78: Come On – The Distants (Temptations) – Northern 1960 & Warwick 1960
15. I know – Futuretones (Edwin Starr) – Tress 1957
16. Wyatt Earp – The Marquees (Marvin Gaye) – Okeh 1958
17. Mama Loochie – Harvey & The Moonglows (Marvin Gaye) – Chess 1959
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #218

Air Week: July 7-13, 2014

Marvin Phillips

Marvin Phillips is important to post WWII rhythm & blues, because he, along with Jesse Belvin helped to popularize the R&B duo. Jesse and Marvin scored an enormous hit in 1952 with the ballad, “Dream Girl,” thus paving the way for future R&B duos like Shirley & Lee, Gene & Eunice, Robert & Johnny, Don & Dewey and Marvin’s own, Marvin & Johnny. This week’s “Juke In The Back” takes a look at Marvin Phillips’ impressive career, from his first record in 1950, singing lead with Richard Lewis & The Barons to Marvin & Johnny’s short stint on Aladdin Records in 1957. Along the way, Jesse Belvin weaves in and out of Marvin’s singing career and a diverse array of records are recorded. Matt The Cat spotlights this oft unsung hero of Los Angeles R&B, Marvin Phillips, on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Forever – Richard Lewis & The Barons – Modern 1950 
3. Tall, Brown Woman – Big Jay McNeely w/ 3 Dots & A Dash – Imperial 1951
4. Wine Woogie – Marvin Phillips & The Men From Mars – Specialty 1952
5. Dream Girl – Jesse & Marvin – Specialty 1952 
6. Baby Doll – Marvin & Johnny & The Marsmen – Specialty 1953 
7. Salty Dog – Marvin Phillips – Swing Time 1953 
8. Anna Marie – Marvin Phillips – Swing Time 1954 
9. How Long She Been Gone – Marvin & Johnny & The Marsmen – Specialty 1954 
10. Cherry Pie – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1954
11. Tick Tock – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1954 
12. Kiss Me – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1954 
13. GREAT 78 – Ain’t That Right – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1955
14. Ko Ko Mo – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1955 
15. Will You Love Me – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1955
16. Have Mercy Miss Percy – Long Tall Marvin – Modern 1956
17. Yak Yak – Marvin & Johnny – Aladdin 1957
18. Sweet Dreams – Marvin & Johnny – Modern 1955
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #217

Air Week: June 30-July 6, 2014

4th Of July R&B Picnic4th Of July: R&B Songs About Food

What’s more American than celebrating America’s birthday with some good ol’ red, white and Rhythm & Blues about THE Fourth of July staple: food? Dig in on an hour of classic R&B about hot dogs, cole slaw, potato salad, ribs and ice cream sung by the heroes of the “soul that came before rock n’ roll” on the Juke In The Back.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Rib Joint – Sam Price & His Texas Bluesicians – Savoy 1956 
3. House Of Blue Lights – Ella Mae Morse With Don Raye – Capitol 1946
4. Smoky Joe’s Caf – The Robins – Spark 1955
5. Chicken Shack – Amos Milburn – Aladdin 1956
6. Everybody Eats When They Come To My House – Cab Calloway – Columbia 1947
7. Pass The Biscuits Please – Andre Williams – Fortune 1957
8. Beans & Cornbread – Louis Jordan – Decca 1949 
9. Corn Bread – Hal Singer Sextette – Savoy 1948 
10. Hot Dog – Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames – Okeh 1949
11. Dumplin’s – Doc Bagby – Okeh 1957
12. Monkey Hips & Rice – The “5” Royales – King 1954
13. GREAT 78  – Cole Slaw – Frank Culley – Atlantic 1949
14. Pork Chops & Mustard Greens – Ernie Andrews With Maxwell Davis Orch – Imperial 1951
15. Cabbage Greens #2 – Champion Jack Dupree – Okeh 1940
16. The Frim Fram Sauce – King Cole Trio – Capitol 1945 
17. Solid Potato Salad – Ella Mae Morse – Capitol 1943 (Prev. Unreleased)
18. Ice Cream Man – John Brim – Chess 1953 
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #216

Air Week: June 23-29, 2014

Memphis SlimMemphis Slim

Memphis Slim dubbed himself the “Ambassador Of The Blues” and for good reason. He spread the gospel of America’s music around the world during his almost 50 year career. This week, Matt The Cat and the “Juke In The Back” take a look at Slim’s prodigious contribution to the genre. He began recording as Pete Chatman (his real name is John Chatman) in 1940 and by the end of the year was already known as Memphis Slim, a name given to him by a producer at Bluebird Records. His prolific career really took off after WWII, when he cut some incredible sides for Miracle Records, a little Chicago independent label. He scored a #1 R&B hit in 1948 with “Messin’ Around,” which is seldom heard or celebrated today. He would enter the R&B lists four more times during the late 1940s and twice in the early ’50s for the Premium and United Labels. Even though the US Senate honored Memphis Slim in the early ’70s with an “Ambassador of Good Will” title, he is hardly recognized today for his important contribution to Blues, Rhythm & Blues and early Rock n’ Roll. Get the story behind the story of Memphis Slim on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Diggin’ My Potatoes No. 2 – Peter Chatman & His Washboard Band – Okeh 1940
3. Beer Drinking Woman – Memphis Slim – Bluebird 1940
4. Rockin’ The House – Memphis Slim – Miracle 1947
5. Messin’ Around – Memphis Slim & His House Rockers – Miracle 1948
6. Frisco Bay – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1949
7. Blue And Lonesome – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1949
8. Help Me Some – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1949
9. Nobody Loves Me – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1949
10. Angel Child – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1949
11. Really Got The Blues – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers– Premium 1950
12. Havin’ Fun – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Premium 1950
13. GREAT 78 – Kilroy Has Been Here – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Miracle 1947
14. No Mail Blues – Memphis Slim & His Orch. – Mercury 1951
15. Mother Earth – Memphis Slim & The House Rockers – Premium 1951
16. The Come Back – Memphis Slim & His House Rockers – United 1953
17. Sassy Mae – Memphis Slim & His House Rockers – United 1954 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #215

Air Week: June 16-22, 2014

The Cardinals

The Cardinals only scored 3 R&B hits, but all 3 made the top ten and are considered classics today. The group formed in Baltimore in late 1946 and came to the attention of Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson, co-founders of Atlantic Records in very early 1951. They were signed immediately and soon Atlantic sent their house arranger, Jesse Stone, down to Baltimore to work with the group and prep them for their first recording session, which was held in March, 1951. The Cardinals, who were known as the Mellotones at that time, were used to singing pop songs. Jesse Stone had to give them that R&B sound. Their first release, “Shouldn’t I Know,” climbed the R&B charts and put The Cardinals on the map. Their version of “The Wheel Of Fortune” in 1952 is considered the definitive R&B version of that song today as is their 1955 rendition of the Chuck Willis penned tune, “The Door Is Still Open.” Lead tenor Ernie Warren has one of the most beautiful and distinguishable voices in all of early R&B and Matt The Cat brings The Cardinals’ music and legacy to life on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. For Awhile – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1953 (Prev. Unreleased)
3. Shouldn’t I Know – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1951
4. Pretty Baby Blues – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1952 
5. I’ll Always Love You – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1952
6. Wheel Of Fortune – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1952 
7. She Rocks – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1952 
8. Lovie Darling – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1953 
9. You Are My Only Love – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1953 
10. Under A Blanket Of Blue – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1954
11. Misirlou – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1955
12. The Door Is Still Open – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1955 
13. GREAT 78 – Kiss Me Baby – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1952 
14. Come Back My Love – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1955
15. Lovely Girl – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1955 
16. Choo Choo – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1956 
17. The End Of The Story – The Cardinals – Atlantic 1956 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #214

Air Week: June 9-15, 2014

Rosco GordonRosco(e) Gordon

This week, the “Juke In The Back” spotlights the “Prince of Primitive Cool,” Rosco Gordon. His mostly self-penned tunes, feature his unique blend of mid-tempo shuffle with a slightly behind-the-beat rolling barrelhouse piano line. He was a master at making his recordings sound rough, but there was also a lot of blues sophistication buried under the simplicity. In his early recording days at RPM Records, his name was spelled Roscoe. He would later revert back to its original spelling of Rosco. His 2nd RPM release hit the national R&B top ten in 1951, but it was 1952’s “Booted” and “No More Doggin'” that put Gordon at the forefront of Rhythm & Blues popularity. His biggest hit came in 1959 with “Just A Little Bit” on Vee-Jay. It hit #2 on the R&B lists and crossed over to #64 on the Pop Chart. More people bought this record than of his others. Rosco Gordon is often overlooked, but this week Matt The Cat sets the record straight. He was an innovator, influencing the Jamaican Ska movement of the early ’60s, a hit maker and a unique and talented bluesman. Gordon’s records spin on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Roscoe’s Boogie – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1951
3. Saddled The Cow (And Milked The Horse) – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1951
4. Booted – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1952
5. Cold Cold Winter – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1952
6. No More Doggin’ – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1952
7. Maria – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1952
8. Lucille (Looking For My Baby) – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1953
9. Hey Fat Girl – Rosco Gordon – Duke 1953
10. T Model Boogie – Rosco Gordon – Duke 1953
11. You Figure It Out – Rosco Gordon – Duke 1954
12. Just Love Me Baby – Rosco Gordon – Sun 1955
13. GREAT 78 – Ouch! Pretty Baby – Roscoe Gordon & His Orch – RPM 1951
14. Cheese And Crackers – Rosco Gordon – Sun 1956
15. Tummer Tee – Rosco Gordon w/ Joe Scott Orch – Duke 1957
16. Going Home – Rosco Gordon – Vee-Jay 1959
17. Just A Little Bit – Rosco Gordon – Vee-Jay 1959
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #213

Air Week: June 2-8, 2014

Ike Turner

One of Rhythm & Blues’ greatest innovators was also one of its most notorious personalities. Ike Turner was born in the same place that the blues was born, in the heart of the Mississippi Delta in Clarksdale in 1931. He learned boogie woogie piano was the legendary Pinetop Perkins and soon taught himself how to play guitar. His band, The Kings Of Rhythm, recorded what some would come to name as the “first Rock n’ Roll Record” with “Rocket 88″ in 1951. The Chess label called them “Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats,” but it didn’t matter, Ike Turner’s stamp is all over that groundbreaking record, which was based on Jimmy Liggins’ 1948 R&B classic, “Cadillac Boogie.” From there, Turner became a talent scout for both Sam Phillips at Sun Records and The Bihari Brothers at RPM Records. He played behind Howlin’ Wolf, Little Milton, Elmore James, Otis Rush and many others while also releasing his own important sides. Matt The Cat sorts through the many record labels and incarnations of The Kings Of Rhythm on this week’s “Juke In The Back,” as we honor one of music’s most tragic, but important figures, the legendary Ike Turner.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Rocket 88 – Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats – Chess 1951
3. Real Gone Rocket – Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats – Chess 1951 
4. You Know I Love You – B.B. King – RPM 1952 
5. How Many More Years – Howlin’ Wolf – Chess 1951 
6. Sho’ Nuff I Do – Elmore James – Flair 1954
7. I Miss You So – Dennis Binder & His Orch – Modern 1954 
8. Hoo-Doo Say – The Sly Fox – Spark 1954 
9. Peg Leg Woman – Willie King With The Ike Turner Band – Vita 1956 
10. I’m Tore Up – Billy Gayles With Ike Turner’s Rhythm Rockers – Federal 1956
11. I’m On Your Trail – Ike Turner – Royal American 1965 – Recorded 1958 
12. BoxTop – Ike Turner, Carlson Oliver & Little Ann – Tune Town 1958
13. GREAT 78 – Ho-Ho – Icky Renrut – Stevens 1959 
14. Matchbox – Ike Turner’s Kings Of Rhythm – Cobra 1959 (Unreleased at the time) 
15. Double Trouble – Otis Rush & His Band – Cobra 1958
16. Hey-Hey – Icky Renrut – Stevens 1959
17. Fool In Love – Ike & Tina Turner – Sue 1960 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #212

Air Week: May 26 – June 1, 2014


Johnny AceJohnny Ace

He is often called the “first casualty of rock n’ roll,” since his life was brought to a controversial end just as rock n’ roll was picking up steam in the mainstream, but Johnny Ace’s demise does not overshadow his impressive, yet short career. This week’s “Juke In The Back” highlights Ace’s early session with rising star, B.B. King, as well as a his rare first solo record, cut for the Bihari Brothers in 1951, but not released by them until 1953. Ace tasted success early, as his first single for the fledgling Duke Records soared to the top of the R&B charts. He would have 2 more #1 smashes, including “Pledging My Love,” which was released posthumously and hit an impressive #17 on the pop lists. Yes, Johnny Ace died young and became immortal in verse and tribute and Matt The Cat shows you why he was much revered on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. 3 O’Clock Blues – B. B. King – RPM 1951 
3. Midnight Hours Journey – Johnny Ace – Flair 1953 – Recorded 1951 
4. My Song – Johnny Ace w/ The Beale Streeters – Duke 1952 
5. Angel – Johnny Ace w/ The Beale Streeters – Duke 1953 – wr by Mattis & Ace
6. Cross My Heart – Johnny Ace w/ The Beale Streeters – Duke 1953 – #3, Ace on organ
7. Ace’s Wild – Johnny Ace w/ The Beale Streeters – Duke 1953 – inst w/ Ace on piano
8. The Clock – Johnny Ace w/ The Beale Streeters – Duke 1953 
9. Saving My Love For You – Johnny Ace w/ Johnny Otis Orch – Duke 1953
10. Yes Baby – Johnny Ace w/ Johnny Otis Orch – Duke 1953
11. Please Forgive Me – Johnny Ace w/ Johnny Otis Orch – Duke 1954 
12. Never Let Me Go – Johnny Ace /w Johnny Board & His Orch – Duke 1954 
13. GREAT 78 – How Can You Be So Mean – Johnny Ace w/ Johnny Board & His Orch – Duke 1955
14. Pledging My Love – Johnny Ace w/ Johnny Otis Orch – Duke 1955
15. Anymore – Johnny Otis w/ Johnny Otis Orch – Duke 1955 
16. No Money – Johnny Otis w/ Johnny Board & His Orch – Duke 1955
17. Johnny Has Gone – Varetta Dillard – Savoy 1955 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #211

Air Week: May 19-25, 2014

1952: Jukebox Rhythm Review Pt. 2

This week, the jukebox is in the spotlight as Matt The Cat takes you back 60 years and highlights the top jukebox hits of the second half of 1952. You’ll hear a lot more than just the big #1 R&B hits this week as we dig deep into the jukebox lists to feature seldom heard tunes by Illinois Jacquet, Varetta Dillard and Sonny Thompson with Lula Reed. These are the top requested records that were spinning on the jukebox in the back of the establishment. It’s part 2 of 2 on the 1952 Rhythm Review on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Easy, Easy Baby – Varetta Dillard – Savoy 1952
3. Lawdy Miss Clawdy – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1952
4. I’ll Drown In My Own Tears – Sonny Thompson – King 1952
5. Call Operator 210 – Floyd Dixon – Aladdin 1952
6. Mary Jo – The Four Blazes – United 1952
7. Ting-A-Ling – The Clovers – Atlantic 1952
8. My Song – Johnny Ace With The Beale Streeters – Duke 1952
9. Juke – Little Walter & His Night Cats – Checker 1952
10. The Bells Are Ringing – Smiley Lewis – Imperial 1952
11. Beside You – The Swallows – King 1952
12. Goodbye Baby – Little Caeser – Recorded In Hollywood 1952
13. GREAT 78 – Rock Me All Night Long – The Ravens – Mercury 1952
14. Five Long Years – Eddie Boyd – J.O.B. 1952
15. You Know I Love You – BB King & His Orch – RPM 1952
16. Port Of Rico – Illinois Jacquet & His Orch – Mercury 1952
17. I Don’t Know – Willie Mabon & His Combo – Chess 1952
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #210

Air Week: May 12-18, 2014

1952: Jukebox Rhythm Review Pt. 1

This week, the jukebox is in the spotlight as Matt The Cat takes you back 62 years and highlights the top jukebox hits of the first half of 1952. You’ll hear a lot more than just the big #1 R&B hits this week as we dig deep into the jukebox lists to feature seldom heard tunes by John Greer & His Rhythm Rockets, Dinah Washington and Marie Adams. These are the top requested records that were spinning on the jukebox in the back of the establishment. It’s part 1 of 2 on the 1952 Rhythm Review on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Flamingo – Earl Bostic & His Orch – King 1951
3. Cry – Johnnie Ray & The Four Lads – Okeh 1951
4. She Moves Me – Muddy Waters – Chess 1952
5. 3 O’clock Blues – BB King – RPM 1952
6. Got You On My Mind – John Greer & His Rhythm Rockets- RCA Victor 1952
7. Night Train – Jimmie Forrest – United 1952
8. Wheel Of Fortune – Dinah Washington – Mercury 1952
9. Booted – Roscoe Gordon – RPM & Chess 1952
10. Dust My Broom – Elmo James – Trumpet 1952
11. One Mint Jullep – The Clovers – Atlantic 1952
12. I’m Gonna Play The Honky Tonks – Marie Adams – Peacock 1952
13. GREAT 78 – Baby Please Don’t Go – The Orioles – Jubilee 1952
14. 5-10-15 Hours – Ruth Brown – Atlantic 1952
15. Moody’s Mood For Love – King Pleasure – Prestige 1952
16. Have Mercy Baby – The Dominoes – Federal 1952
17. Goin’ Home – Fats Domino – Imperial 1952
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #208

Air Week: May 5-11, 2014

Moonglows Pt. 2The Moonglows, Pt. 2

Much has been written about the great R&B vocal groups of the 1950s. Many of the classic groups were either great musicians and vocalists and never had the recognition or record sales to back it up or these groups were thrown together, they couldn’t sing very well and scored one, solid hit that still spins in the eternal jukebox of public consciousness. The Moonglows were one of the few groups to come out of the post World War II, pre-Elvis era, who were extremely talented and had the sales figures and notoriety to back it up. Originally called The Crazy Sounds, Harvey Fuqua and Bobby Lester led The Moonglows to a #1 R&B smash in 1954 with “Sincerely” on Chess, but that was after a somewhat bumpy start on Alan Freed’s Champagne Records and Chicago’s Chance Records. This week, Matt The Cat presents part 2 of a 2 part feature on the fantastic Moonglows, covering their career from 1956 through their breakup in 1958 and the singles that followed through the end of 1961. An interview with the late Reese Palmer reveals how Harvey Fuqua came to hire his group, The Marquees as the “new” Moonglows. This week’s “Juke In The Back” shares the rest of the story on this influential and important 1950s vocal group.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. We Go Together – The Moonglows – Chess 1956

3. Chickie Um Bah – The Moonglows
4. See Saw – The Moonglows – Chess 1956 – July
5. When I’m With You – The Moonglows – Chess 1956
6. Over and Over Again (slow version) – The Moonglows – Chess 1956
7. Over and Over Again (fast version) – The Moonglows – Chess 1956
8. Please Send Me Someone To Love – The Moonglows – Chess 1957
9. Mr. Engineer (Bring Her Back To Me) – The Moonglows – Chess 1957
10. The Beating Of My Heart – The Moonglows – Chess 1957
11. Here I Am – The Moonglows – Chess 1957
12. Sweeter Than Words – The Moonglows – Chess 1958
13. GREAT 78 – I Knew From The Start – The Moonglows – Chess 1956
14. Ten Commandments Of Love – Harvey & The Moonglows – Chess 1958
15. Mean Old Blues – Harvey & The Moonglows – Chess 1958
16. Twelve Months Of The Year – Harvey & The Moonglows – Chess 1959
17. Blue Velvet – Bobby Lester & The Moonglows – Chess 1961
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #208

Air Week: April 28-May 4, 2014

MoonglowsThe Moonglows, Pt. 1

Much has been written about the great R&B vocal groups of the 1950s. Many of the classic groups were either great musicians and vocalists and never had the recognition or record sales to back it up or these groups were thrown together, they couldn’t sing very well and scored one, solid hit that still spins in the eternal jukebox of public consciousness. The Moonglows were one of the few groups to come out of the post World War II, pre-Elvis era, who were extremely talented and had the sales figures and notoriety to back it up. Originally called The Crazy Sounds, Harvey Fuqua and Bobby Lester led The Moonglows to a #1 R&B smash in 1954 with “Sincerely” on Chess, but that was after a somewhat bumpy start on Alan Freed’s Champagne Records and Chicago’s Chance Records. This week, Matt The Cat presents part 1 of a 2 part feature on the fantastic Moonglows, covering their career from 1953 to 1955. Vocal harmony doesn’t get much sweeter than this, so don’t miss one note of this week’s “Juke In The Back” radio program.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. I Just Can’t Tell No Lie – The Moonglows – Champagne 1953
3. Baby Please – The Moonglows w/ Red Holloway Orch– Chance 1953
4. Secret Love – The Moonglows w/ Red Holloway Orch – Chance 1954
5. Real Gone Mama – The Moonglows w/ Red Holloway Orch – Chance 1954
6. I Was Wrong – The Moonglows w/ Red Holloway Orch – Chance 1954

7. 219 Train – The Moonglows w/ Red Holloway Orch – Chance 1954
8. Sincerely – The Moonglows – Chess 1954
9. Tempting – The Moonglows – Chess 1954
10. Shoo Doo-Be-Doo (My Loving Baby) – Bobby Lester & The Moonlighters – Checker 1954
11. So All Alone – Bobby Lester & The Moonlighters – Checker 1954
12. Most Of All – The Moonglows – Chess 1955
13. GREAT 78 – I’ve Been Your Dog (Ever Since I’ve Been Your Man) – Moonglows – Champagne 1953
14. She’s Gone – The Moonglows – Chess 1955
15. I’m In Love – The Moonglows – Chess 1955
16. In My Diary – The Moonglows – Chess 1955
7. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #207

Air Week: April 21-27, 2014

The Robins

This week, the “Juke In The Back” features The Robins, one of the earliest and most influential West Coast R&B vocal groups. They first appeared on wax in April of 1949 as the 4 Bluebirds, backed up by bandleader extraordinaire, Johnny Otis, who had discovered the group at his Barrelhouse Nightclub during a talent competition. Otis had the Robins duet with Little Esther on the 1950 smash, “Double Crossing Blues,” which spent more than 2 months at the top of the R&B charts. Real fame came when the group hooked up with the young, talented songwriting duo of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. On their Spark Records, the Robins scored with “Riot In Cell Block #9″ and “Smokey Joe’s Caf ,” two early rock n’ roll smashes. Two members would leave The Robins and form The Coasters with Leiber and Stoller and much of their history is complicated, but host Matt The Cat gets to the bottom of it all with this “Juke In The Back” look at The Robins’ early career. This truly is the “soul that came BEFORE rock n’ roll” and you’ll only hear it on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. My Baby Done Told Me – The Four Bluebirds – Excelsior 1949
3. Around About Midnight – The Robins – Score 1949
4. If It’s So, Baby – The Robins – Savoy 1949
5. If I Didn’t Love You So – The Robins – Savoy 1949
6. Double Crossing Blues – Johnny Otis Quintet, The Robins & Little Esther  – Savoy 1950
7. Turkey Hop – The Robins – Savoy 1950
8. School Girl Blues – The Robins – Recorded In Hollywood 1950
9. That’s What The Good Book Says – Bobby Nunn With The Robins – Modern 1951
10. How Would You Know – The Robins  – RCA 1953
11. Get It Off Your Mind – The Robins – RCA 1953
12. Double Crossin’ Baby – The Robin – Crown 1954
13. GREAT 78 – Rockin’ – Bobby Nunn With The Robins – Modern 1951
14. Riot In Cell Block #9 – The Robins – Spark 1954
15. Framed – The Robins – Spark 1954
16. Smokey Joe’s Caf  – The Robins – Spark 1954
17. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #206

Roy BrownRoy Brown 

Roy Brown was one of early R&B’s undisputed blues shouters. He burst on the scene in 1947 with the original recording of “Good Rockin’ Tonight,” which would become a rock n’ roll and blues classic when covered by Wynonie Harris, Elvis Presley and countless others. He managed to chart 16 R&B hits from 1947-1957, most of them in the late ’40s and early ’50s. Many of these songs never get played on the radio anymore, but this week’s “Juke In The Back” with Matt The Cat will set the record straight as we spin every charting hit of Roy Brown’s career. We’ll dig on Brown’s jump blues, his ballads and his late career New Orleans comeback. So get down to the sound of Good Rockin’ Roy Brown on this week’s “Juke In The Back,” the “soul that came BEFORE rock n’ roll!”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Good Rocking Tonight – Roy Brown w/ Bill Ogden & His Orch– DeLuxe 1948 
3. ‘Long About Midnight – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1948 
4. Rainy Weather Blues – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
5. ‘Fore Day In The Morning – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
6. Rockin’ At Midnight – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
7. Miss Fanny Brown – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
8. Please Don’t Go (Come Back Baby) – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
9. Boogie At Midnight – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1949 
10. Hard Luck Blues – Roy Brown W/ The Griffen Brothers Orch – DeLuxe 1950 
11. Love Don’t Love Nobody – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1950 
12. Cadillac Baby – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1950 
13. GREAT 78 – Lolly Pop Mama – Roy Brown w/ Bill Ogden & His Orch – DeLuxe 1948 
14. ‘Long About Sundown – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1950 
15. Big Town – Roy Brown W/ The Griffen Brothers Orch – DeLuxe 1951 
16. Bar Room Blues – Roy Brown & His Mighty-Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1951 
17. Let The Four Winds Blow – Roy Brown – Imperial 1957 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #205

Sam CookeSam Cooke

The “Juke In The Back” features a full hour of Sam Cooke, one of the distinctive and expressive voices ever pressed in wax. Cooke’s early period singing gospel with the renowned Soul Stirrers is often cited, but hardly ever featured. Matt The Cat focuses on Sam Cooke’s early days from 1951 to 1957, begriming with his recordings with the Soul Stirrers up through his R&B and pop breakthrough of 1957. Matt is joined by author Peter Guralnick, who wrote the definitive biography on Cooke called “Dream Boogie: The Triumph Of Sam Cooke,” filling in the background on one of the 20th Century’s most revered singers. Cooke was also a noted songwriter, producer and entrepreneur, starting his own SAR Records in the late 1950s. Few African-American artists went further during the 1950s while jamming the juke boxes with tremendous gospel, R&B and pop hits. Hear the man who invented soul, this week on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. You Send Me (Demo) – Sam Cooke – Unreleased 1957 
3. Peter Guralnick Interview 1 – Beginnings 
4. Peace In The Valley – The Soul Stirrers – Specialty 1951 
5. Peter Guralnick Interview 2 – Soul Stirrers 
6. Just Another Day – The Soul Stirrers – Specialty 1952 
7. Peter Guralnick Interview 3 – Sam’s Voice 
8. Touch The Hem Of His Garment – The Soul Stirrers – Specialty 1956 
9. Farther Along – The Soul Stirrers – Specialty 1956 
10. Peter Guralnick Interview 4 – Leaving Soul Stirrers 
11. Wonderful – The Soul Stirrers –Specialty 1956 
12. Peter Guralnick Interview 5 – Switch To Secular Music 
13. Lovable – Sam Cooke – Specialty 1957 
14. That’s Heaven To Me – The Soul Stirrers – Specialty 1957 
15. GREAT 78 – Summertime – Sam Cooke – Keen 1957 
16. I’ll Come Running Back To You – Sam Cooke – Specialty 1957 
17. Mean Old World – Sam Cooke – Specialty 1957 
18. You Were Made For Me – Sam Cooke – Keen 1958 
19. Win Your Love For Me – Sam Cooke – Keen 1958 
20. Somewhere There’s A Girl – Sam Cooke – Unreleased 1961 
21. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #204

Paul GaytenPaul Gayten

Paul Gayten is one of the unsung heroes of rhythm & blues and one of the many architects of rock n’ roll. This week, Matt The Cat spotlights Gayten’s great contributions to music on the “Juke In The Back.” Paul Gayten scored the first New Orleans’ hit of the post World War II R&B era with “True (You Don’t Love Me)” in 1947, thus kicking off a legacy of rhythm hit-making and influence from the Crescent City. His work with vocalists Annie Laurie and Chubby “Hip Shakin'” Newsome is legendary. As a songwriter, producer and talent scout for Chess Records, Gayten discovered and signed Clarence Henry and Bobby Charles and worked with Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley. Gayten made great contributions to R&B and Rock n’ Roll, but gets very little recognition these days. Matt The Cat and the “Juke In The Back” are out to change that with this week’s heartfelt dedication to the late, great Paul Gayten.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! – Paul Gayten – Regal 1951 
3. True (You Don’t Love Me) – Paul Gayten Trio – DeLuxe 1947 
4. Since I Fell For You – Annie Laurie w/ Paul Gayten & His Trio – DeLuxe 1947 
5. Hip Shakin’ Mama – Chubby “Hip Shakin’” Newsome & Her Hip Shakers– DeLuxe 1949 
6. Cuttin Out – Annie Laurie w/ The Paul Gayten Orch – Regal 1949 
7. Fishtails – Paul Gayten Orch – Regal 1949 
8. I’ll Never Be Free – Annie Laurie w/ Paul Gatyen & His Orch – Regal 1950 
9. I Ain’t Gonna Let You In Annie Laurie and The Paul Gayten Orch – Regal 1950 
10. 3×7=21 – Annie Laurie w/ Paul Gayten – Prev Unreleased Demo 
11. Cow Cow Blues – Paul Gayten – Okeh 1953 
12. You Better Believe It – Paul Gayten – Checker 1956 
13. GREAT 78 – Get It – Paul Gayten – Checker 1954 
14. The Music Goes Round and Round – Paul Gayten – Argo 1956 
15. Nervous Boogie – Paul Gayten – Argo 1957 
16. The Hunch – Paul Gayten – Anna 1959 
17. Ain’t Got No Home – Clarence Henry “Frog Man” – Argo 1956 
18. Suzette – Paul Gayten – Regal 1950 
19. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #203

New Orleans R&BNew Orleans R&B, Pt. 3

This week, it’s part 3 of “Juke In The Back”‘s 3 part series on the great, influential and infectious music that came out of New Orleans, one of America’s most fertile musical cities. In fact, the “Crescent City” is often cited as the birth place of Jazz, The Blues, R&B and Rock n’ Roll. While New Orleans certainly had its share of influential talent, from Louis Armstrong and Paul Gayten to Fats Domino and Dr. John, it’s hard to give one single region all the credit. The music that flowed from this fruitful ground is definitely something special and on part 3, Matt The Cat will look at New Orleans R&B from 1955 to 1957, highlighting records by Fats Domino, Dave Bartholomew, Eddie Bo, Huey “Piano” Smith, Smiley Lewis, Annie Laurie and many more. So get ready for some real jumpin’ musical jambalaya on your source for vintage Rhythm & Blues on the “Juke In The Back.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Those Lonely Lonely Nights – Earl King – Ace 1955 
3. Poor Me – Fats Domino – Imperial 1955 
4. Later, Alligator – Bobby Charles – Chess 1955 
5. So Glad She’s Mine – Charles “Hungry” Williams w/ Paul Gayten Orch– Checker 1956 
6. Try Rock n’ Roll – Bobby Mitchell – Imperial 1956 
7. Long Tall Sally – Little Richard – Specialty 1956 
8. Little Liza Jane – Huey Smith & His Rhythm Aces – Ace 1956 
9. Cotton Picking Hands – The Dukes – Imperial 1956 
10. Rockin’ At Cosimo’s – Lee Allen & Band – Aladdin 1956 
11. Blueberry Hill – Fats Domino – Imperial 1956 
12. Ain’t Got No Home – Clarence Henry “Frog Man” – Argo 1956 
13. GREAT 78 – Hey Bo – Eddie Bo – Apollo 1956 
14. It Hurts To Be In Love – Annie Laurie – DeLuxe 1957 
15. The Monkey – Dave Bartholomew – Imperial 1957 
16. Rockin’ Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu – Part 1 and 2 – Huey Smith & The Clowns – Ace 1957 
17. Let The Four Winds Blow – Roy Brown – Imperial 1957 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #202

New Orleans R&BNew Orleans R&B, Pt. 2

This week, it’s part 2 of “Juke In The Back”‘s 3 part series on the great, influential and infectious music that came out of New Orleans, one of America’s most fertile musical cities. In fact, the “Crescent City” is often cited as the birth place of Jazz, The Blues, R&B and Rock n’ Roll. While New Orleans certainly had its share of influential talent, from Louis Armstrong and Paul Gayten to Fats Domino and Dr. John, it’s hard to give one single region all the credit. The music that flowed from this fruitful ground is definitely something special and on part 2, Matt The Cat will look at New Orleans R&B from 1953 to 1955, highlighting records by Professor Longhair, Fats Domino, Dave Bartholomew, Lloyd Price, Shirley & Lee, Eddie Bo and many more. Next week on part 3, we’ll wrap up our series with a look at New Orleans R&B from 1955-1957. So get ready for some real jumpin’ musical jambalaya on your source for vintage Rhythm & Blues on the “Juke In The Back.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Ain’t It A Shame – Lloyd Price & His Orch. – Specialty 1953 
3. 4-11=44 – Bobby Mitchell & The Toppers – Imperial 1953 
4. The Things That I Used To Do – Guitar Slim & His Band – Specialty 1953 
5. Tipitina – Professor Longhair & His Blues Scholars – Atlantic 1954 
6. Jock-A-Mo – Sugar Boy & His Cane Cutters – Checker 1954 
7. I Didn’t Want To Do It – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
8. Blue Monday – Smiley Lewis – Imperial 1954 
9. Toy Bell – The Bees – Imperial 1954 
10. Jam Up – Tommy Ridgley & His Band – Atlantic 1954 
11. Mardi Gras Mambo – The Hawketts – Chess 1955 
12. GREAT 78 – Jump Children – Dave Bartholomew – Imperial 1954 
13. Feels So Good – Shirley & Lee – Aladdin 1955 
14. I Hear You Knocking – Smiley Lewis – Imperial 1955 
15. So Glad – Little Bo & Orch – Ace 1955 
16. Tutti Frutti – Little Richard & His Band – Specialty 1955 
17. Rich Woman – Li’l Millet & His Creoles – Specialty 1955 
18. Shrimp & Gumbo – Dave Bartholomew – Imperial 1955 
19. Ain’t It A Shame – Fats Domino – Imperial 1955 
20. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #201

New Orleans R&B, Pt. 3New Orleans R&B, Pt. 1

This week, “Juke In The Back” begins a 3 part series on the great, influential and infectious music that came out of New Orleans, one of America’s most fertile musical cities. In fact, the “Crescent City” is often cited as the birth place of Jazz, The Blues, R&B and Rock n’ Roll. While New Orleans certainly had its share of influential talent, from Louis Armstrong and Paul Gayten to Fats Domino and Dr. John, it’s hard to give one single region all the credit. The music that flowed from this fruitful ground is definitely something special and on part 1, Matt The Cat will look at New Orleans R&B from 1940 to 1953, highlighting records by Professor Longhair, Fats Domino, Dave Bartholomew, Lloyd Price and Shirley & Lee, just to name a few. Next week on part 2, we’ll look at the years 1953-55 and then we’ll wrap up the series with a look at 1955-57. So get ready for some real jumpin’ musical jambalaya on your source for vintage Rhythm & Blues on the “Juke In The Back.

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Where You At – Lloyd Price – Specialty 1953 
3. Junker’s Blues – Champion Jack Dupree – Okeh 1940 
4. True – Paul Gayten Trio – DeLuxe 1947 
5. ‘Long About Midnight – Roy Brown & His Mighty Mighty Men – DeLuxe 1948 
6. For You My Love – Larry Darnell – Regal 1949 
7. Stack-A’Lee Pt. 1 & 2 – Archibald & His Orch – Imperial 1950 
8. Mardi Gras In New Orleans – Professor Longhair & His New Orleans Boys – Atlantic 1950 
9. The Fat Man – Fats Domino – Imperial 1950 
10. Two Faced Woman (A Two Faced Man) – James Wayne & His Orch. – Imperial 1951 
11. Lawdy Miss Clawdy – Lloyd Price & His Orch. – Specialty 1952 
12. I’m Gone – Shirley & Lee – Imperial 1952 
13. GREAT 78 – Bald Head – Roy Byrd & His Blues Jumpers – Mercury 1950 
14. My Ding-A-Ling – Dave Bartholomew – King 1952 
15. Teachin’ & Preachin’ – Royal Kings – Specialty 1952 
16. The Bells Are Ringing – Smiley Lewis – Imperial 1952 
17. Going To The River – Fats Domino – Imperial 1953 
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #200

The SpidersThe Spiders

New Orleans is not known for its R&B vocal groups.  In a city where jazz, blues and zydeco thrive, one vocal group rose to the top: The Spiders.  In two short years, the Spiders landed enduring hits like “I Didn’t Want To Do It,” “I’m Slippin’ In” and “Witchcraft,” led by brothers Chuck and Chick Carbo.  They were produced by the legendary Dave Bartholomew and recorded at Cosimo Matassa’s J&M Studios with the cream of New Orleans’ session musicians.  When the hits stopped coming, Chuck Carbo left the group for a solo career, thus ending their time in the spotlight.  Matt The Cat explores The Spiders’ story on this week’s “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Jungle Juice – Stick McGhee – King 1953 
3. I’ve Been Around – Little Willie John – King 1956 
4. Bye & Bye – The Spiders – (Prev. Unreleased) Imperial 1953 
5. I Didn’t Want To Do It – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
6. Tears Began To Flow – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
7. I’m Slippin’ In – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
8. The Real Thing – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
9. 21 – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
10. Am I The One – The Spiders – Imperial 1955 
11. Bells In My Heart – The Spiders – Imperial 1955 
12. Witchcraft – The Spiders – Imperial 1955 
13. How I Feel – Chuck Carbo & The Spiders – Imperial 1956 
14. GREAT 78 – You’re The One – The Spiders – Imperial 1954 
15. A-1 In My Heart – The Spiders With Chuck Carbo – Imperial 1956 
16. Goodbye – The Spiders With Chuck Carbo – Imperial 1956 
17. Poor Boy – Chuck Carbo – Imperial 1957 
18. Wild, Wild Young Men – Ruth Brown – Atlantic 1953 
19. My Saddest Hour – The Five Keys – Aladdin 1953 
20. Smoke From Your Cigarette – The Mellows – Jay-Dee 1955 
21. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #199

Aladdin Records Part 2

The Aladdin Records Story, Pt. 2

The “Juke In The Back” concludes its two part series on Aladdin Records, one of the most important independent labels of the pre-rock era. Part 2 will pick up the Aladdin Records Story in 1950 and carry it through til rock n’ roll began hitting the mainstream in 1954. This week, we’ll hear more hits from Aladdin’s early hit-makers, Amos Milburn and Charles Brown. We’ll also dig some of the newcomers, like Floyd Dixon, Peppermint Harris, Calvin Boze, Shirley & Lee, the Five Keys and more. Aladdin was a rare label in that almost everything they pressed was worth hearing. If you ever see a discarded Aladdin 45 by an artist you’ve never heard before, pick it up, because chances are it’ll make you very, very happy. Matt The Cat hosts the Aladdin Records Story, Part 2, this week on the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947
2. Jay’s Frantic – Big Jay McNeely – Aladdin 1950
3. Safronia B – Calvin Boze & His All-Stars – Aladdin 1950
4. Shotgun Blues – Lightnin’ Hopkins Singing And Accompanying Himself On Guitar – Aladdin 1950
5. Bad Bad Whiskey – Amos Milburn – Aladdin 1950 
6. Telephone Blues – Floyd Dixon With Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers – Aladdin 1951
7. Black Night – Charles Brown – Aladdin 1951
8. Blue Turning Grey Over You – Billie Holiday w/ Tiny Grimes Sextet – Aladdin 1951
9. Glory Of Love – The Five Keys – Aladdin 1951
10. I Got Loaded – Peppermint Harris – Aladdin 1951
11. Call Operator 210 – Floyd Dixon – Aladdin 1952 
12. I Need You, I Want You – Jack (The Bear) Parker Featuring Emmet Davis, Vocalist – 7-11 1952 
13. GREAT 78 – Hucklebuck With Jimmy – The Five Keys – Aladdin 1951 
14. I’m Gone – Shirley & Lee – Aladdin 1952 
15. Way Down Boogie – Harold Burrage w/ Jimmy Binkley & His Orch – Aladdin 1953
16. Don’t Leave Me Baby – Lowell Fulson & His Orch – Aladdin 1953
17. Don’t Let Go (Hold Me, Hold Me, Hold Me) – The Cookies – Lamp 1954
18. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946

Episode #198

Aladdin Records Pt. 1The Aladdin Records Story: Part 1

The “Juke In The Back” begins a two part special on one of the most important record labels of the pre-rock era, Aladdin Records. Eddie and Leo Mesner started Aladdin as Philo Records in 1945. It was one of the first independent labels on the West Coast and sought to fill in the R&B void left by major labels like Victor, Decca and Columbia. The Mesners hired Maxwell Davis to help with musical arrangements and back up their artists and got the label off to a jumpin’ start. In February of 1946, Philo became Aladdin and a record label icon was born. With artists like Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers featuring Charles Brown, Helen Humes, Illinois Jacquet, Wynonie Harris, Amos Milburn and some rare releases from a young Robins group, how could Aladdin possibly fail? They didn’t and in the process, they helped propel rhythm & blues into the mainstream, paving the way for the emergence of Rock n’ Roll. This week’s show focuses on the beginning of the label from 1945-49 and next week’s show will feature 1950 to the birth of Rock n’ Roll. Grab some nickels, because the party’s getting ready to start down at the Chicken Shack…with Matt The Cat and the “Juke In The Back.”

1. Swanee River Boogie – Albert Ammons – Mercury 1947 
2. Flyin’ Home Pt 1 & 2 – Illinois Jacquet & His All-Stars – Philo 1945 
4. He May Be Your Man – Helen Humes & The Bill Doggett Octet – Philo 1945 
5. Be-Baba-Leba – Helen Humes & The Bill Doggett Octet – Philo 1945 
6. Baby Don’t You Cry – Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers – Philo 1945 
7. Driftin’ Blues – Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers – Philo 1945 
8. When I’m In My Tea – Jo Jo Adams With Maxwell Davis & His Band – Aladdin 1946 
9. Down The Road Apiece – Amos Milburn – Aladdin 1946 
10. Guitar In My Hand – Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown Singing And Accompanying Himself On Guitar With Maxwell Davis & His Orch – Aladdin 1947 
11. GREAT 78 – (I Don’t Stand A) Ghost Of A Chance – Wynonie “Mr. Blues” Harris & His All-Stars Accompanied By The Harlemaires – Aladdin 1947 
12. Chicken Shack Boogie – Amos Milburn – Aladdin 1948 
13. Milky White Way – The Trumpeteers – Score 1948 
14. Trouble Blues – Charles Brown – Aladdin 1949 
15. Around About Midnight – The Robins – Score 1949 
16. After Hours – Erskine Hawkins – Bluebird 1946